1. 14:31 24th Aug 2014

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from idmil

    image: Download

    idmil:

(photo by Vanessa Yaremchuk)
Dr. Xenia Pestova with The Rulers. This digital musical instrument was originally designed by David M. Birnbaum and is currently undergoing an overhaul, by Carolina Brum Medeiros, involving sensor fusion.

    idmil:

    (photo by Vanessa Yaremchuk)

    Dr. Xenia Pestova with The Rulers. This digital musical instrument was originally designed by David M. Birnbaum and is currently undergoing an overhaul, by Carolina Brum Medeiros, involving sensor fusion.

     
  2. 15:57 14th Aug 2014

    Notes: 1

    Reblogged from idmil

    image: Download

    idmil:

(photo by Vanessa Yaremchuk)
Dr. Xenia Pestova demonstrating the FM Gloves, created by Mark T. Marshall (based on the original design by Pierre-Yves Fortier) for the McGill Digital Orchestra Project.
This image was included in the art show for ScienceOnline2012.

    idmil:

    (photo by Vanessa Yaremchuk)

    Dr. Xenia Pestova demonstrating the FM Gloves, created by Mark T. Marshall (based on the original design by Pierre-Yves Fortier) for the McGill Digital Orchestra Project.

    This image was included in the art show for ScienceOnline2012.

     
  3. 19:19 5th Aug 2014

    Notes: 1654

    Reblogged from rarely-important

    theremina:

     Sophie Kahn Sculptures

    "I combine cutting-edge means of reproduction, like 3d laser scanning and 3d printing, with ancient bronze casting techniques. Using damaged 3d data, I create sculptures and video works that resemble de-constructed monuments or memorials."

    "The precise 3d scanning technology I use was never designed to capture the body, which is always in motion. When confronted with a moving body, it receives conflicting spatial coordinates, generating a 3d ‘motion blur’. From these scans, I create videos or life-sized 3d printed mold sculptures. The resulting sculptures bear the artifacts of all the digital processes they have been though. The scanning and 3d printing process strips color and movement from the body, leaving behind only traces of its form – a scan of the face resembles nothing more than a digital death mask."

    (via asylum-art)

     
  4. 22:51 3rd Aug 2014

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from realitymonster

    realitymonster:

    Physella acuta (pond snail) embryo. I guess snails have hearts. Yes, that’s The Police (Synchronicity) playing in the background. #microscopy #aquarium #snails

     
  5. 22:06 30th Jul 2014

    Notes: 135060

    Reblogged from zohbugg

    (Source: rgstewey)

     
  6. 08:20 28th May 2014

    Notes: 303098

    Reblogged from realitymonster

    mechanicbird:

    eroticmirotic:

    timemachineyeah:

     

    I’ve said this before and I’ll point it out again - 

    Menstruation is caused by change in hormonal levels to stop the creation of a uterine lining and encourage the body to flush the lining out. The body does this by lowering estrogen levels and raising testosterone. 

    Or, to put it more plainly “That time of the month” is when female hormones most closely resemble male hormones. So if (cis) women aren’t suited to office at “That time of the month” then (cis) men are NEVER suited to office.

    If you are a dude and don’t dig the ladies around you at their time of the month, just think! That is you all of the time. 

    And, on a final note, post-menopausal (cis) women are the most hormonally stable of all human demographics. They have fewer hormonal fluctuations of anyone, meaning older women like Hilary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren would theoretically be among the least likely candidates to make an irrational decision due to hormonal fluctuations, and if we were basing our leadership decisions on hormone levels, then only women over fifty should ever be allowed to hold office. 

    Reblogging hard for that last comment.

    I WANTED TO SAY THIS BUT THEN SOMEONE ELSE DID and I’m damn proud.

    (Source: r-dart)

     
  7. Support Damien’s longform article on magic and machine intelligence. From his description:

    I’ll also examine the use of cutting edge tech in modern magical practices and vice versa. Musicians, roboticists, and authors who weave magical intentions through electronic music, who use magical theory in the programming of their creations and who see in our world, something like the fulfilment of Arthur C. Clarke’s line that “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

    Damien Williams has been writing, teaching and organising conferences on this topic and the philosophical approach magic offers in considering theories of mind, the future of AI, and how humans relate to technological progress.

    Any amount helps, and just $10 gets you updates, an ebook download, and access to the first draft.

     
  8. Quadrocopter Slalom Learning - Work by Angela Schoellig, Fabian Mueller and Raffaello D’Andrea.

     
  9. "Swiss researchers have created a metallic cube that can "walk" across a surface. Staff at the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich crammed a series of inertia sensors and constantly-spinning rotors (called reaction wheels) into a 15-centimeter cube, dubbed Cubli, that enable the contraption to move around on its own. When one or more of the weighted rotors abruptly stops spinning, the machine sort of jumps on its edge — all thanks to centrifugal force. Once upended, the rotors act like a gyroscope to maintain Cubli’s position. Halt another wheel and things get really crazy: the device defies gravity, tipping up and balancing on one of its eight corners. By repeating these motions in succession, the gizmo uses a series of controlled falls to slowly hop across a surface. In terms of practical applications, the Swiss researchers said this tech could aid in remote planetary exploration, possibly giving the Curiosity rover and its ilk some company. All noble goals, but for now the lab says that Cubli is just a high-tech toy. And that? That’s perfectly fine."

     
  10. Years, Bartholomäus Traubeck:

    "A tree’s year rings are analysed for their strength, thickness and rate of growth. This data serves as basis for a generative process that outputs piano music. It is mapped to a scale which is again defined by the overall appearance of the wood (ranging from dark to light and from strong texture to light texture). The foundation for the music is certainly found in the defined ruleset of programming and hardware setup, but the data acquired from every tree interprets this ruleset very differently."